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Summer predatory fish angling tips

Summer predatory fish angling tips

Although predatory fish anglers might enjoy the best fishing during the summer, it is not always easy to catch fish during the warmer months of the year. We’ve listed the most important tips for catching four species of predatory fish in summer. Read on!

1. Perch

Choosing a spot
Always fish in places with a current, as flowing water is better oxygenated and therefore home to the most active fish. Covering distance is especially important in the summer months: perch are more widely distributed, which means the schools are often smaller. If you do come across perch, you’ll usually be able to catch them within a few casts, after which activity often drops off. Therefore, don’t stay in one spot for too long – move around instead and cover a lot of water. When fishing along the rivers, be sure to also try spots near ferries.



Artificial lures
Artificial lures such as crankbaits, chatterbaits and spinnerbaits are ideal. They are easy to fish and make a lot of noise, enabling you to cover a large area of water. By comparison to the winter months, in which you often have to give the perch time to take the lure, the pace increases somewhat during summer. The fish are more active and often give themselves away by their visible hunting behaviour. The best times to fish for perch are early in the morning and in the last hours of the day.

2. Asp

Choosing a spot
Rivers are perfect waters for asp. Look out for turbulence, eddies and other places where small fish get into trouble due to the current. You will encounter different conditions in river pools, and you will have to look for schools of bait fish. Narrower waters offer spots with a faster current, such as weirs, pumping stations and water outlets, and these are also worthy of attention. Make sure to carefully check the VISplanner beforehand to find out the local rules.
 


Artificial lures
This predator mainly focuses on young fish and therefore prefers smaller prey. Therefore, consider small lures such as crankbaits, rattle crankbaits, jerkbaits/glide baits, pirks, poppers and top water lures in smaller sizes – roughly 4-8 cm. The most commonly used technique for asp is high-speed fishing. This certainly yields results, but it certainly doesn’t hurt to increase the variety of your presentation. If the asp are hunting on the surface, then using poppers or top water lures will guarantee a spectacle!

3. Pikeperch

Choosing a spot
While pikeperch are generally to be found in the turbulent waters around river groynes, during the summer it is worth moving further out into the groyne zone. However, be sure to do this mainly in the evening, as the ‘glass eyes’ are not very active during the day. Don’t walk along the groyne as many anglers do; instead, start in the crook of the groyne. There are many more potential hotspots for catches under the cover of darkness than in broad daylight.



Artificial lures
You can choose plugs or shads for this kind of angling. Where hard baits are concerned, slender, elongated plugs with a slow and subtle wobble are preferable. Because you are fishing close to the shore, shallow diving plugs are the best choice as pikeperch are likely to come up and take it. If you prefer soft baits, then choose a larger size (4, 5 and 6 inches). When fishing at twilight and in the dark, you can afford to slow the pace a bit. The vibrations from the plug or shad (which you can fish in a straight line while spinning or jigging) may seem almost undetectable to you, but the pikeperch will definitely notice them, even in the dark.


4. Wels catfish

Choosing a spot
The wels catfish generally shuns the light, so this species is not usually very active in full sun at the height of summer. If you are fishing during the day, then choose spots that offer shelter, such as bridges, jetties, wharfs, boats, submerged trees and eroded banks. You will still notice, however, that dawn, dusk and complete darkness will yield the best results.



Artificial lures
Although the wels catfish is an impressive predator with an especially large mouth, you shouldn’t discount the use of relatively small lures. Even a 9 cm plug can help you land a monster. Try to trigger the wels catfish by using a rattle plug or a plug that moves in a jittery way. Another good option is a slender 12-18 cm shad with a tempting paddle tail that has a nice, jerky action even when fished slowly. Don’t immediately dismiss what seem like illogical spots either – you can catch wels catfish in the strangest places!
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